Personal Finance

shot of social security card Kameleon007 People who receive Social Security benefits and who do not submit tax returns will not have to file in order to get a government stimulus check. The announcement by the Treasury Department and Internal Revenue Service on Wednesday night reverses earlier guidance that said those people would have to
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NoDerog | E+ | Getty Images Those government stimulus checks should be on their way soon to millions of Americans. Many people have still have a lot of questions about them. Last week, Washington lawmakers approved a $2 trillion relief bill in response to the coronavirus outbreak that includes a payment of $1,200 for single taxpayers
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Don’t be surprised if your employer pauses its contributions to your 401(k) plan during the U.S. economic downturn. As the coronavirus pandemic wallops the economy, and businesses deal with dropping revenue and limited cash flow, employers are exploring how to trim their obligations to those plans without violating federal regulations. Companies commonly give to worker’s
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Amid a global pandemic and sharp economic slowdown, college-bound high school seniors are giving their state schools a second look. Thanks to heightened financial concerns, students and families may be more likely to choose local and less-expensive public schools rather than private universities far from home, according to Robert Franek, editor in chief of The Princeton Review
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JGI/Jamie Grill There’s one thing you may be overlooking when it comes to managing your cash during the coronavirus outbreak — your health savings account. An HSA is a savings account you can use to pay for qualified medical expenses. You contribute momney pre-tax, the savings grow tax-free and your withdrawals generally aren’t taxed. HSAs
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College acceptance letters are already in the mail. Now high school seniors must decide their fate for September. Up until now, National College Decision Day, the deadline for high school seniors to choose which college they will attend, has always been May 1. This year, however, the global coronavirus pandemic and extreme economic uncertainty have pushed many
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Cabania | iStock | Getty Images Plus Congress has passed a $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus bill, and you’re probably already counting up the money you could receive in relief checks — if you’re eligible. Generally, individuals who earn $75,000 or less qualify for $1,200 one-time payments, while couples making $150,000 or less may receive $2,400.
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Yellow Dog Productions  What does the legislation do? The bill — the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act — expands unemployment insurance, a program enacted in 1935 to provide temporary income support for workers who lose their jobs. The legislation does three primary things: offers bigger unemployment checks, increases the duration of those payments and extends
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Small businesses are getting a potential lifeline from Congress. The massive $2 trillion economic rescue package — expected to get final approval from Congress on Friday — includes provisions aimed at helping smaller employers weather the economic storm brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. “We are cautiously optimistic that this will provide the cash flow
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katleho Seisa Congress may permit retirees to skip required minimum distributions from their retirement savings. The House coronavirus relief bill, which was released yesterday, contains a provision that waives for 2020 the required minimum distributions from individual retirement accounts and workplace retirement plans. A similar provision is in the latest version of the Senate bill.
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Getty Images Several Democratic senators have teamed up to propose giving Social Security beneficiaries an extra $200 per month in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic and the economic devastation it is causing. The plan was put forward last week by Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.; Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.; and Ron Wyden, D-Ore. The extra income
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Before the coronavirus pandemic brought the U.S. economy to a near halt, millions of student loan borrowers were already struggling to keep up with their monthly bills. Now, as more people find themselves with less or no income during the pandemic, consumer advocates and former government officials say the Trump administration’s efforts to help student loan borrowers
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